Sunday, February 9, 2014

The Return of Routine

My routines disappear completely during the school holidays.  The return to school and work means that my teeth return to getting flossed regularly, I drink more water, and my sewing time condenses to an hour each afternoon during the week.  We are all still getting used to the return of routine!

Yesterday was one of those parenting days better forgotten.  After screaming, swearing and the slamming of doors (that was just me), and retreating to my sewing cave, I discovered that my larger sewing machine had lost its tension.  New needle, new thread, new bobbin, a bit of a clean, a bit better of a clean, another rethread... still no joy.  So much for those plans to start some blanket stitch on those My Tweet blocks. 

Instead I pulled out another WIP project, and did a bit of figuring.  As I was still a bit wild around the edges, a calculator, pen and paper seemed the way to go.

Recap, I had five dresden fan blocks and seventeen Modern Cross blocks.  The layout worked best if I made another three MC blocks - which gave me space to fit in the frame and sashing around the dresdens.  First up I sewed the last grey centre down on the dresden fans (again, that hand sewing gets put aside every time).


The Inspiration... Nordic Star from the Fat Quarterly Shape Book for Quilters.  This quilt is organised as rows of blocks with a variety of piecing, sashing and negative space.  You will have noticed that my blocks are different... of course, they started as completely different projects and are different sizes to the original.  I'm sure I'm not the only person who starts projects in this way??  I call it the Evolution Method of Design :0)  I have great faith.


By close of day today, there was some progress, the frame and sashing for the dresden fan row almost complete... well, four done.

I'm working with Essex Linen in Flax as the background fabric.  I wouldn't want to do complicated piecing with it... but so far so good.

And the extra Modern Cross blocks...

I've sort of been putting this one off - you know how you do - resisting sewing those extra blocks, and then imagining the quilt maths much worse than it really was.  A bit of a picture... some simple addition and subtraction, (some deep breathing) and I was away.  Funny how that works out isn't it?

I also did a bit more work on my Tillies Lane blocks, these are so cute finishing at 3"


This is what I've finished so far.  The background dot is just there for effect... as I haven't decided how to approach that area yet.  The coloured bits are 100% random scraps... with the inner triangles all the same cream solid.

Yip, I see that one pointing the wrong way :0)

Reading through the BOM instructions, I should be doing 24 blocks per month.  So far I've done 11 over the last three or so months.  Whoops.  This is where the being organised bit would be good.  If I have any chance of getting this finished this century... I should try and do six blocks per week.  We'll see how that works.

My hand work schedule has been another routine that has gone by the by over the holidays.  On the agenda this week is finishing up the Giant Chevron baby quilt hand stitching on the binding.  Then next week I'm going to do something exciting.  Promise.  I am so sick of sewing binding down :0)



3 comments:

  1. Sewing down binding is exciting- it means a FINISH! I love that Nordic Star quilt- and Dresdens are on my list, so I think it might be time to re-visit this one! Thanks for the reminder.

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  2. I wrote a whole comment out about my bad behaviour with the kids yesterday and bloglovin ate it :( and it ended with a really clever pun about hoping that your and your machine's tension returns to normal soon. It doesn't sound nearly as clever second time around, blinkin' bloglovin' mutter, mutter, mutter...

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  3. Ha ha on the slamming of doors... So human :) it's a good thing we have our sewing retreats, right. I think your quilt will be fantastic. I too bookmarked the Scandinavian quilt a while back for inspiration. What a clever way to use those odd blocks

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